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FOR THE RECORD
May 28, 2012
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May 28, 2012

For The Record

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| RETIRED |

After 15 years in the majors, Cubs righthander Kerry Wood. He fanned White Sox outfielder Dayan Viciedo on three pitches in the eighth inning at Wrigley Field last Friday, a fitting end to a career that included one of the most memorable performances in history—when, as a 20-year-old rookie making just his fifth big league start, Wood hurled a 20-strikeout, one-hit complete game to beat the Astros 2--0 on May 6, 1998. Wood (above) had 16 stints on the disabled list, totaling 946 days, and was switched from starter to reliever in 2007 to preserve his arm. The change prolonged his career, and he became the only pitcher in history with at least 75 wins, 50 saves and 10 strikeouts per nine innings. "You know when it's time," Wood, 34, said last Friday. "I've got no regrets."

| DIED |

At 59 of a heart attack, former West Virginia football coach Bill Stewart. Stewart spent 24 years as an NCAA assistant, two years as a CFL assistant and three years as the coach at VMI before, as the interim coach in Morgantown, he led the 11th-ranked Mountaineers to a 48--28 upset of No. 3 Oklahoma in the 2008 Fiesta Bowl following the abrupt defection of Rich Rodriguez to Michigan. The victory propelled Stewart (right), who always liked to refer to his players as "lads," to the job full time. But though he went 27--12 over the next three seasons, he was never able to duplicate the spectacular result. And his departure from the head coaching position made more headlines than his performance. On Dec. 16, 2010, athletic director Oliver Luck announced that Stewart would be replaced by Dana Holgorsen after the 2011 season. The next June, the lame-duck Stewart was forced to step down when a former reporter with The Pittsburgh Post-Gazette said that Stewart had asked him to dig up dirt on Holgorsen and smear his name. Although Luck could not confirm any wrongdoing by Stewart, the university requested and received his resignation.

| DIED |

Of cancer at 89, Peter D. Fuller, owner of Dancer's Image, who won the 1968 Kentucky Derby by a length and a half and then became the only horse to be stripped of the roses after the painkiller phenylbutazone was found in his urine on race day. (Kentucky relaxed its ban on the substance in '74.) Fuller maintained for the rest of his life that someone else had given Dancer's Image the drug or that the test results had been forged, saying he had been targeted by racist Southerners because of his support for civil rights, including his donation of a $62,000 winner's purse to Coretta Scott King after her husband's assassination. (One of Fuller's stables was set on fire, and he received death threats after his gift to King.) Fuller vowed he wouldn't take another horse to the Derby unless he thought it could win. He never found that horse, and thus never got to use the name he had chosen for it: Dancer's Revenge.

| REJECTED |

By the International Olympic Committee, proposals from the government of Israel and two members of Congress to observe a moment of silence at the London Games in recognition of the 40th anniversary of the 1972 terrorist attacks that killed 11 Israeli coaches and athletes. In the years since, the families of the victims have frequently lobbied the IOC for an official moment of silence to be observed at all future Olympics. The request by the Israeli government was made specifically for the 2012 Games. IOC president Jacques Rogge, who competed as a yachtsman for Belgium at the '72 games, said last week that the IOC "has officially paid tribute to the memory of the athletes on several occasions and will continue to do so in close coordination with the National Olympic Committee of Israel." IOC members have previously said that they were reluctant to alienate other members of the Olympic community with any specific reference to the attacks.

| DIED |

Of a brain aneurysm at 75, former college, Olympic and NBA player Bob Boozer. A two-time All-America at Kansas State, Boozer (left) was the first pick of the 1959 NBA draft, but he delayed playing for the Cincinnati Royals for a season so that he could maintain his amateur eligibility and play for the U.S. at the Rome Games. He was a reserve and played mostly a defensive role, scoring 6.8 points per game for a U.S. team that won eight games by an average of 42.4 points on the way to a gold medal. He then averaged 14.8 points and 8.1 rebounds over an 11-year NBA career with the Royals, Knicks, Lakers, Bulls (with whom he was an All-Star in '68), SuperSonics and finally the Bucks, with whom he won a title in '71, his last season. He and his '60 Olympic teammates were inducted into the Basketball Hall of Fame in 2010.

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