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LETTERS
November 28, 2011
• Anyone who thinks a proposed $2,000 stipend for college athletes will cure the ills of big-time college athletics is naive. Some athletes, particularly the stars, will still have their hands out. Ask Reggie Bush if $2,000 would have altered his decision to accept much more than that in illegal benefits from a sports agent while he was on scholarship at USC.
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November 28, 2011

Letters

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• Anyone who thinks a proposed $2,000 stipend for college athletes will cure the ills of big-time college athletics is naive. Some athletes, particularly the stars, will still have their hands out. Ask Reggie Bush if $2,000 would have altered his decision to accept much more than that in illegal benefits from a sports agent while he was on scholarship at USC.

Joe Doney, Jacksonville

Some of George Dohrmann's proposals about compensation for student-athletes (Pay for Play, Nov. 7) seem frightening. The operating budget of a university should include enough money to run all of its athletic programs fairly. The idea of cutting sports or demoting some to club status based on a strange combination of Title IX regulations, free-market economics and a conjured-up need to pay certain athletes threatens the heart of college sports.

Jon Murray, Little Meadows, Pa.

I don't think it's the business model for college athletics that's flawed; the flaw lies in the federally mandated rules of Title IX. Women play the same intercollegiate sports that men play except for football, which demands a much larger roster than any other sport. The only real solution would be a revision of Title IX that omits football. Maybe then athletic programs could balance their budgets and have a little extra for stipends.

David J. Eveld, Seguin, Texas

Backup Plan

I was pleased to read Kelli Anderson's article about the NBA players who are returning to college during the lockout (SCORECARD, Nov. 7). Whether they are completing degrees or pursuing coaching opportunities, these guys seem to understand that a career in pro sports doesn't last forever, and that without something to fall back on, there is little chance for prolonged success beyond the court.

Rachel Weeks, Billerica, Mass.

American Express

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