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September 06, 2010
Bruce Schoenfeld's article captured the romantic essence of a lost art in baseball. I wish more writers would pay attention to the nuances and details of sports. To hear players speak of the "mystical" nature of stealing home reminds us all that there is something still very pure about this game.
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September 06, 2010

Letters

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Bruce Schoenfeld's article captured the romantic essence of a lost art in baseball. I wish more writers would pay attention to the nuances and details of sports. To hear players speak of the "mystical" nature of stealing home reminds us all that there is something still very pure about this game.

Chris Lang, Bethlehem, Pa.

While reading Schoenfeld's piece (Stealing Home, Aug. 16), I felt as though I were standing on third base waiting to see if the pitcher would foolishly revert to his windup. I recalled the flow of adrenaline and the way time slows down until the next delivery. Thanks for conjuring up those goose bumps and making me feel like I was 17 again.

Joshua R. Smith Taneytown, Md.

Schoenfeld contends that Grady Sizemore's steal of home in 2005 proved to be of only aesthetic value for the Indians because Travis Hafner homered two pitches later. I'd argue that the steal was responsible for two runs scoring. Each pitch does not occur in a vacuum. Would Hafner have seen the same two pitches from the Blue Jays' Dustin McGowan had Sizemore remained at third base? Also, it's very likely Sizemore's steal caused McGowan to lose focus, resulting in the gopher ball.

Greg Nelson, Duluth

I was disappointed that this story did not mention one of the greatest home plate thefts of all time. On Aug. 22, 1982, third-string catcher Glenn Brummer of the Cardinals broke for home with two outs and two strikes in the bottom of the 12th inning for a 5--4 win over the Giants. I was in Busch Stadium that day, and it was the most exciting sports play I have ever witnessed.

Dan Eichholz, Rochester, Ill.

What about Ty Cobb and his 54 career steals of home, including a high of eight in a single year (1912)?

Marc Gullickson Cedar Rapids, Iowa

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