SI Vault
 
19TH HOLE: THE READERS TAKE OVER
Edited by Gay Flood
June 18, 1979
BRUCE'S PLAYERSir:It isn't often that a caddie makes the cover of SI (June 4), but as Tom Watson keeps winning, his caddie, Bruce Edwards, is also becoming well known, especially here in Wethersfield, Conn., his hometown and, incidentally, the site of the Sammy Davis Jr. Greater Hartford Open.
Decrease font Decrease font
Enlarge font Enlarge font
June 18, 1979

19th Hole: The Readers Take Over

View CoverRead All Articles View This Issue

BRUCE'S PLAYER
Sir:
It isn't often that a caddie makes the cover of SI (June 4), but as Tom Watson keeps winning, his caddie, Bruce Edwards, is also becoming well known, especially here in Wethersfield, Conn., his hometown and, incidentally, the site of the Sammy Davis Jr. Greater Hartford Open.

Which reminds me of a story about Jack Nicklaus and his caddie, Angelo Argea. A year or so ago, when Nicklaus was trying to get to the green at one tournament, someone said, "Make way for Angelo and his player." Perhaps soon they will say, "Make way for Bruce and his player."
ROBERT M. ELRICK
Wethersfield, Conn.

PREDICTIONS
Sir:
Before everyone starts criticizing your NBA playoff predictions (It's Washington [City] vs. Washington [State], by George, April 16), I would like to congratulate you. The playoffs were just starting when that story appeared, and you correctly said that the Bullets would win in the East, and they did. You said that the SuperSonics would win the West, and they did. You said that their final series would go only five games, and you were right. You said the Bullets would win. They didn't, but three out of four isn't bad.
BOB KIRLIN
Spokane

Sir:
You were 3,000 miles off. Our Sonics are super!
JEFF DANNER
Bremerton, Wash.

SILAS, UNSELD...AND DANDRIDGE
Sir:
Surely Paul Silas is one NBA player who has made the best of his limited skills (The Bullets Weather an Ice Storm, May 28). However, John Papanek said, "He and Washington's Wes Unseld...are participating in their fourth NBA championship series, more than any other active players." I believe that this statement is in error. Washington's Bobby Dandridge was also participating in his fourth. In 1971 and 1974 he went to the finals with the Milwaukee Bucks, and in 1978 he got there again with the Washington Bullets.
REGINALD RIESOP
Whiteriver, Ariz.

SALMON
Sir:
For one of my college courses, I recently wrote a research paper concerning the deterioration of the salmon run on the Columbia River in the Northwest. Your timely article (Clamor Along the Klamath, June 4) on the Klamath River run has reaffirmed my prognosis: the salmon is all but dead, and only its persistent drive to survive has delayed the burial.

Although the Klamath run is threatened with annihilation, man's intervention on the Columbia has created even greater problems there. As on the Klamath, the Indian fisheries are entitled to catch 50% of the Columbia's harvestable run, and commercial fisheries also take a large number of salmon. However, it is the extensive damming of the Columbia River that may prove to be the final—and fatal—blow. Biologists estimate a 15% mortality rate among salmon when they encounter main-stream dams, primarily because of super-saturated nitrogen and turbine kills.

The most distressing aspect of the decline of both the Klamath and Columbia River runs is that the public appears to take little interest. I hope your article will stir up enough public interest to save the depleted stocks of salmon throughout the U.S.
BRIAN JOSEPH HEFTY
Klamath Falls, Ore.

NO MICKEY MOUSE OPERATION
Sir:
As boxing manager and promoter Pete Ashlock's director of boxing from 1975-78, I must correct Douglas S. Looney's contention (Losing Search for a Winner, May 28) that Orlando, Fla. has never had a profitable boxing show. On the contrary, about 25% of my 67 cards made money. And after I moved to New York to become Teddy Brenner's assistant matchmaker at Madison Square Garden early in 1978, I gave Pete two successful main events: Edgar (Mad Dog) Ross vs. Ralph Palladin for the North American junior middleweight (not junior welterweight, as SI said) title, and Howard Davis vs. Larry Stanton, Orlando's first and only nationally televised bout.

While Pete did lose big money in '75, we minimized his red ink the next year, and in 1977 the boxing operation actually generated a profit.
BRUCE TRAMPLER
New York City

Continue Story
1 2 3