SI Vault
 
19TH HOLE: THE READERS TAKE OVER
February 10, 1969
THE NUKES (CONT.)Sirs:As Mr. Boyle has pointed out (The Nukes Are in Hot Water, Jan. 20), the thermal discharge from nuclear power plants is, at present, a major problem. However, with all the expert testimony that is available on the problem, very little is available on good, economic solutions. The low-grade energy that is available should be used, if at all possible, rather than be considered as a pollutant. For instance, this writer visited the Hunterston Nuclear Generating Station in Scotland where a research project uses a small portion of the discharge to raise Dover sole. The sole reach market size in two years instead of four due to the decrease in the length of the growth period.
Decrease font Decrease font
Enlarge font Enlarge font
February 10, 1969

19th Hole: The Readers Take Over

View CoverRead All Articles View This Issue

THE NUKES (CONT.)
Sirs:
As Mr. Boyle has pointed out (The Nukes Are in Hot Water, Jan. 20), the thermal discharge from nuclear power plants is, at present, a major problem. However, with all the expert testimony that is available on the problem, very little is available on good, economic solutions. The low-grade energy that is available should be used, if at all possible, rather than be considered as a pollutant. For instance, this writer visited the Hunterston Nuclear Generating Station in Scotland where a research project uses a small portion of the discharge to raise Dover sole. The sole reach market size in two years instead of four due to the decrease in the length of the growth period.

Studies are being carried out on Long Island to test the growth of oysters in thermal discharges. Carp culture is practiced in Russia, where previously it had been impossible due to the cold water. Shrimp culture has proved successful, and yearling four-inch trout grew to market size in one summer when stocked in the thermal discharge, without supplementary feeding.

These examples, of course, are only a hopeful beginning—not final solutions.
RONALD STEWART
Atmospheric Sciences
Research Center
State University of New York
Albany, N.Y.

Sirs:
Mr. Boyle's article is grossly less than a complete appraisal of the power industry's constructive environmental efforts, and particularly those of New York State Electric & Gas Corp.

It is a matter of record, though not mentioned in your article, that the Citizens Committee to Save Cayuga Lake has never opposed the construction of NYSE&G's power plant. In fact, they have repeatedly stated in their own publications and in public news media that they are not opposed to the plant. The committee wants only to be assured that the plant will fit safely into the Cayuga Lake environment.
A. D. TUTTLE
Binghamton, N.Y.

Sirs:
May I commend you on the very fine article on thermal pollution. As one of the Lehigh scientists, I worked for five years on the Delaware River study in Martins Creek. Dr. Mihurksy, who is also quoted, was with us on that project.

The author has presented a clear and accurate picture of one of the most urgent of our conservation problems. You have reached a wide audience with this article, but how can we educate the politicians and utility men? From bitter experience, I know it will not be an easy task but, from other research projects on industrial pollution in which I have been engaged, may I say that there are some industries that are earnestly trying to control pollution of our most vital resource—water.
ELEANOR W. HERTZ
Assistant Professor of Biology
Marywood College
Scranton, Pa.

Sirs:
Please accept our congratulations on being the commercial publication that has done more to advance the cause of conservation than any other. Throughout 1968 your many and thoughtful articles in this field were forthright, enlightening and educational.
CHARLES W. MOORE
President
U.S. Canoe Association
Indianapolis

L.A. AND THE LAKERS
Sirs:
After reading Frank Deford's fictional story on the Los Angeles Lakers (On Top—but in Trouble, Jan. 27), I am compelled to separate fact from fiction for him.

FICTION: "Some season-ticket seats are conspicuously unused." FACT: Season-ticket holders have appeared for this season's Laker games, 1968-69, in greater numbers than last season's, 1967-68, by .5%.

Continue Story
1 2 3