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...AND WHERE THE BOYS ARE THE GIRLS ARE SURPRISING
August 03, 1964
Most of them were pretty young—almost all of them were pretty—and this is not considered a winning combination for track meets. But the American women had trained hard against an old history of defeat and this time they performed with an attractive maturity
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August 03, 1964

...and Where The Boys Are The Girls Are Surprising

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Most of them were pretty young—almost all of them were pretty—and this is not considered a winning combination for track meets. But the American women had trained hard against an old history of defeat and this time they performed with an attractive maturity

Javelin Thrower Lurline Hamilton, an 18-year-old from Louisiana, warms up for event outside the Coliseum by grasping an overhanging branch and stretching her full 5 feet 8.

Striding back from one-two finish in the 100-meter dash, Edith McGuire (left) and Wyomia Tyus seem a perfect sister act. They are, in fact, an inch apart in height, four pounds in weight and about equally fast.

American schoolgirls Eleanor Montgomery (left), 18, and Terrezene Brown, 17, placed first and second in the high Jump ahead of the proud Russians, and then happily retired to the infield to enjoy their triumph.

In any other Los Angeles setting, the akimbo, warming-up exercises of Alternate Hurdler Sally Griffith might seem studio-inspired. Here, they merely reflect a smiling intentness.

The U.S. team's oldest runner at 26, Sandra Knott is a Cleveland nurse now appearing on the athletic strawhat circuit—wearing unofficial but wackily feminine headgear.

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