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The Pennant Race Bubbles Along
August 29, 1960
It is almost over in the National League, but in the American tension continues to build like a young hurricane from day to day, lashing ballplayers on to peaks of brilliance, dropping them a moment later with an awful thud. In this turmoil of physical effort the Yankees, White Sox and Orioles have discovered moments of calm, of peace and of introspection, when even a big league ballplayer battling for a pennant can behave like anyone else—or maybe like anyone else's son.
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August 29, 1960

The Pennant Race Bubbles Along

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It is almost over in the National League, but in the American tension continues to build like a young hurricane from day to day, lashing ballplayers on to peaks of brilliance, dropping them a moment later with an awful thud. In this turmoil of physical effort the Yankees, White Sox and Orioles have discovered moments of calm, of peace and of introspection, when even a big league ballplayer battling for a pennant can behave like anyone else—or maybe like anyone else's son.

Best bubble blower on Orioles is Pitcher Milt Pappas, who demonstrates talent before the admiring gaze of Jerry Walker.

As Aparicio snoozes, Kluszewski exhibits unexpected taste for sophisticated literary comedy created by Peter De Vries.

Early arrival in Baltimore locker room, Gus Triandos dresses without haste, checks his game bat, wonders idly how this day will be different and what it will bring.

Disgust and delight chase one another across face of Mickey Mantle, who is benched one day for loafing, then breaks up a ball game with two home runs 24 hours later. Below, another Yankee who hit home runs but never loafed discovers during Old-Timers' Day that Joe DiMaggio is still a name of magic, even with fans too young to have seen him play.

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